7 Must Reads for Adoptees and Their Parents

7 Must Reads for Adoptees and Their Parents

Being Adopted, The Lifelong Search for Self by, David M. Brodzinsky, PhD, Marshall D. Shechter, MD & Robin Marantz Henig

Being Adopted The Lifelong Search for Self

This groundbreaking book uses the poignant, powerful voices of  adoptees and adoptive parents to explore the  experience of adoption and its lifelong effects. A major  work, filled with astute analysis and moving truths.

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Birthright: The Guide to Search and reunion for Adoptees, Birthparents, and Adoptive Parents by, Jean A. Strauss

Birthright The Guide to Search and reunion for Adoptees, Birthparents  and Adoptive Parents

What happens when an adoptee decides to locate a birth parent or a birth parent wants to find a child given up long ago? How does one search for people whose names one does not know? And what happens during a reunion? In 1983, Jean A. S. Strauss was faced with these questions when she began her search for her birthmother, and in this inspiring new handbook, she shares her experience. Strauss will help you throughout this significant time. Brimming with important reference sources and dozens of true-life stories, this valuable resource will guide you in:

· Making the difficult decision to search

· Navigating through the emotional turbulence of a reunion

· Dealing with the impact of the search on the adoptive parents

Compassionate and insightful, Birthright is for anyone seeking to connect with someone long lost.

Journey of The Adopted Self by, Betty Jean Lifton

Journey of The Adopted Self

Betty Jean Lifton, whose Lost and Found has become a bible to adoptees and to those who would understand the adoption experience, explores further the inner world of the adopted person. She breaks new ground as she traces the adopted child’s lifelong struggle to form an authentic sense of self. And she shows how both the symbolic and the literal search for roots becomes a crucial part of the journey toward wholeness.

The Connected Child: Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family by, Karyn Purvis, PhD and David Cross, PhD

The Connected Child Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family

The adoption of a child is always a joyous moment in the life of a family. Some adoptions, though, present unique challenges. Welcoming these children into your family–and addressing their special needs–requires care, consideration, and compassion.

Written by two research psychologists specializing in adoption and attachment, The Connected Child will help you: 

  • Build bonds of affection and trust with your adopted child 
  • Effectively deal with any learning or behavioral disorders 
  • Discipline your child with love without making him or her feel threatened

The Connected Parent: Real-Life Strategies for Building Trust and Attachment By, Karyn Purvis, PhD and Lisa Qualls

The Connected Parent Real-Life Strategies for Building Trust and Attachment

There Is Hope for Every Child, Every Parent, and Every Family

Parenting under the best of circumstances can be difficult. And raising children who have come to your home from “hard places,” who have their own set of unique needs, brings even more challenges. You may have discovered that the techniques that worked with your birth children are not working with your adopted or foster child.

Renowned child-development expert Dr. Karyn Purvis gives you practical advice and powerful tools you can use to encourage secure attachment in your family. You will benefit from Karyn’s decades of clinical research and real-world experience. Coauthor Lisa Qualls demonstrates how you can successfully implement these strategies in your home, just as she did in hers.

You will learn how to simplify your approach using scripts, nurture your child, combat chronic fear, teach respect, and develop other valuable tools to facilitate a healing connection with your child.

The Connected Parent will help you lovingly guide your children and bring renewed hope and restoration to your family.  

The Primal Wound By, Nancy Newton Verrier

The Primal Wound

The Primal Wound is a book which is revolutionizing the way we think about adoption. In its application of information about pre- and perinatal psychology, attachment, bonding, and loss, it clarifies the effects of separation from the birth mother on adopted children. In addition, it gives those children, whose pain has long been unacknowledged or misunderstood, validation for their feelings, as well as explanations for their behavior. Since its original publication in 1993, The Primal Wound has become a classic in adoption literature and is considered the adoptees’ bible. The insight which is brought to the experiences of abandonment and loss will contribute not only to the healing of adoptees, adoptive families, and birth parents, but will bring understanding and encouragement to anyone who has ever felt abandoned.

Twenty Things Adopted Kids Wish Their Adoptive Parents Knew by, Sherrie Eldridge

Twenty Things Adopted Kids Wish Their Adoptive Parents Knew

As both an adoptee and president of Jewel Among Jewels Adoption Network, Eldridge brings an original approach to the topic of adoption. In an attempt to inform adoptive parents of the unique issues adoptees face, she discusses adoptee anger, mourning, and shame and adoption acknowledgment while using case studies to illustrate how parents can better relate to their adopted child. This book is solidly written but not without its flaws; most importantly, it lacks information concerning child development, e.g., whether parents should use the same approach to questions with a three-year-old as with a 14-year-old. Still, this book will go well in any collection dealing with adoption, complementing David M. Brodzinsky’s Being Adopted: The Lifelong Search for Self (Anchor, 1993) and Joyce Maguire Pavao’s The Family of Adoption (Beacon, 1998).AMee-Len Hom, Hunter Coll. Lib., New York 

Reach out with questions or to start sessions.

I look forward to hearing from you and discussing what it might look like to work together. Though my in-person practice was based in Brooklyn, New York, I am currently conducting all sessions online via Telehealth. I am able to work with clients from anywhere in New York, or across the country. Just know that treatment with me is a safe and confidential space, wherever it is.

I have a Master of Social Work from New York University. Additionally, I was trained in Art and Dance Therapy at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York. I approach therapy through an attachment lens and understand the importance of developing healthy, emotionally-fulfilling connections with yourself and those closest to you. Let’s talk.

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Becca Leitman’s lens and therapeutic approach are rooted in Attachment Therapy. I believe there is great importance in developing healthy, emotionally-fulfilling connections with yourself and those closest to you. I am currently conducting all sessions online via Telehealth. I am able to work with clients from anywhere in New York, or across the country. Just know that treatment with me is a safe and confidential space, wherever it is. Let’s talk. Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest , Psychology Today and LinkedIn for mental health guidance, stress and anxiety tips, therapy resources and more.

Becca Leitman

Becca Leitman

I’m a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker (LICSW), and have worked with children, adults, and families for over ten years. I earned my Master of Social Work from New York University and received a Bachelor of Photojournalism from Boston University. Additionally, I was trained in Art and Dance Therapy at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and earned a Post Graduate Certificate in Attachment Focused Trauma Therapy.

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