becca-leitman-adoption-therapist-brooklyn

About Becca Leitman

Hello. How are you?

I had an old college professor who used to answer, “I don’t know yet.” I always appreciated the authenticity of his answer as we often ask this question in passing and don’t give such an authentic answer. But what if we did? I like to think that therapy can foster a safe space for you to really say how you are. I became a therapist because I am passionate about people’s well being, and their ability to work through issues and navigate new challenges in order to get to know themselves and live the life they want to live. I love storytelling and therapy is just that, putting together the puzzle pieces of your story to create a new narrative of healing and forward momentum. This is your life, and your path, our work together will guide you in the direction you want to go, and re-direct you when you feel lost or stuck.

I’m a Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker (LICSW), and have worked with children, adults, and families for over ten years. Many clients I see are connected to the adoption and foster care systems, as well as through divorce, whether they be adoptees, parents of blended families with foster and biological children, or someone who spent their childhood in various home settings. As an adoptee in a family that has both biological and adopted children, I find that serving clients in this field gives me the opportunity to share my adoption story and bring my own understanding of these unique family systems to bear. I also help individuals who deal with depression and anxiety, are mourning the loss of a loved one, or who simply want to retake the reins on their life.

I earned my Master of Social Work from New York University and received a Bachelor of Photojournalism from Boston University. Additionally, I was trained in Art and Dance Therapy at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and earned a Post Graduate Certificate in Attachment Focused Trauma Therapy.

I take a relational psychotherapeutic approach to therapy that acknowledges the role of interpersonal and cultural elements in one’s wellness. Setting healthy boundaries, expressing needs, and understanding family dynamics all fall under the scope of this relational approach. My treatment is also deeply rooted in attachment, which underscores the importance of social relationships formed early on in life. As an integrated clinician, I’ve often incorporated the creative arts - from painting to sand tray play - in order to help clients move through challenges in new ways when words fall short.

My extensive time working abroad in orphanages from Cambodia, Ghana, to Costa Rica gave me a broader appreciation of the human experience and a deeper sense of cultural humility. I’m committed to treating every client with deep empathy and providing support along the path to healing. Whatever your circumstances, and wherever you are on your journey, I’ll meet you there and we’ll work together.

Get in touch today to book your first session

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